Understanding Load Capacities of Cable Protection

There are a variety of factors that affect the load capacity of a cable protector. Cable protectors are designed to perform in a range of applications. From commercial venues where traffic mainly consists of pedestrians, cyclists, wheelchairs or strollers to industrial applications where cables need to be protected from large vehicles, cable protectors protect equipment from damage and people from injuries. 

Part of what makes a cable protector suitable for a certain application or environment is the structural design of the various components of a cable protector. Design features such as the thickness of the lid, the size of the channels or the width of the ribs between channels are all variables that—in part—determine the load capacity of a cable protector.

Understanding the various factors that affect load capacity can help users differentiate between cable protectors with similar designs or applications. It is important to note that the load rating of a cable protector does not come from any one design feature; rather, load rating is determined when the composite features of a cable protector are considered as a whole.

Finding the equipment that is best suited to a particular application will maximize a cable protector’s performance. To help you find the cable protector that is right for you, here is a breakdown of the design features of cable protectors that affect the overall load rating.

Design Features That Affect Load Capacity

Number of channels. Another design feature that affects the load rating of a cable protector is the number of channels a cable protector has. The effect that the number of channels has on a cable protector’s load rating depends on the size of the channel itself, the thickness of the ribs that separate the channels, and whether the channel is occupied with a cable or hose. As with other design features, the number of channels should be considered as one factor among many that affects the overall load rating of a cable protector.

Width/height of the channels. The height of a channel refers to the space between the base of a cable protector and the lid, while the width refers to the space between the channels of the cable protector. Some cable protectors have a relatively low profile, while others—like the 2-Channel Heavy-Duty Linebacker®—have much larger channels that are designed for cables with a greater outside diameter. As the height or width of a channel increases, the amount of empty space in a channel also increases, causing the overall load rating of a cable protector to decrease. One way that cable protectors counteract the decrease in load rating due to large channels is to increase the thickness of the channel rib or even incorporate steel inserts in some cases.

It is important to note that the product testing of a cable protector’s load rating is conducted using an empty cable protector that is devoid of any cables or hoses. The stated load rating, therefore, of any cable protector is made with reference to empty channels. This ensures that any correctly sized cable or hose placed into the channels of a cable protector would be protected as long as users adhere to the stated load ratings. 

Thickness of the ribs. The final design feature of a cable protector that impacts the load rating is the thickness of the ribs. A rib refers to the divider that separates individual channels. Ribs function like the columns of a building that support the overall structure. The thicker the rib, the more support that is provided to the cable protector. The thickness of a cable protector’s ribs is partly determined by the intended application for the cable protector. 

Heavy-duty cable protectors incorporate thicker ribs to add to the load rating because of the environment they will be used in. Rib thickness, along with other design features, should be understood as one of several components that determine a cable protector’s load rating.

Thickness of the lid. The thickness of a cable protector’s lid refers to the height of the material used to construct the lid of a cable protection unit. Lid thickness is a design feature that is partly determined by the overall make-up of a cable protector. 

It is important to note that the load rating of a cable protector does not come from any one design feature; rather, load rating is determined when the composite features of a cable protector are considered as a whole. This means that it is possible for a cable protector to have a relatively thin lid and a high load rating because the thin lid is counterbalanced by other design features. In general, a thicker lid means a higher load rating.

Find the Cable Protector That is Right for You

By understanding the factors that affect a cable protector’s load rating, users can more easily navigate the range of cable protector solutions from Checkers Safety™ and find the one that is best suited to the intended application. Whether you are looking for cable protection for light-duty applications like home or commercial use, or heavy-duty industrial, mining or military applications, Checkers Safety has a wide selection of cable protectors that have been designed and tested to protect your cables and hoses in virtually any condition. 

For more information regarding our products, contact a Checkers Safety specialist who can help you find the cable protector that is best suited to your needs.

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